Latest Entries »

Source: Actual size original tablets & fragments at Knossos from Scripta Minoa

Rita Roberts’ elegant translation of Knossos tablet KN 1548 Ok 02.

Once again, Rita Roberts has finessed a translation of an intact military tablet from Knossos. It is significant that Rita mentions that the hilt is directly riveted, whether to ivory overlaid on terebinth, or to the terebinth itself. Although the tablet does not explicitly mention rivets, it is obvious that this was the method the highly skilled Mycenaean sword craftsmen used to attached the blade to the hilt.

The following figures clearly illustrate the marked accuracy of her translation.



Notice in particular the blue stones inlaid in the ivory on the second and third swords in figure 2, and especially in the second. If these stones are lapis lazuli, as I strongly suspect they are, then it follows almost as night follows day that the second sword in particular could only have been reserved for the wanax  transliterated from the Greek into Latin letters for those of you who cannot read Greek  (called wanaka in Linear B), the King of Mycenae, since lapis lazuli was worth a fortune in those days. The second sword could also have been his, though it may also have been the property of the second leader in the Mycenaean hierarchy, the lawaketa, or lawagetas (likewise transliterated into Latin letters) or the leader of the host, in other words the commander-in-chief, the general. I would bet my top dollars on this presumption. I wonder whether Rita would too.  

Bravo,  Rita.

The Mycenaean Scribes & the Linear B Scripts.

Source: The Mycenaean Scribes & the Linear B Scripts.

Source: The Mycenaean Scribes & the Linear B Scripts.

The Invaded Island (Crete)

Source: The Invaded Island (Crete)

Source: Where did the Minoans come from?

Source: Bronze Age tomb groaning with riches found in Greece This post is so important to me because I am right in the middle of translating Linear B Tablets with regard to Military Affairs.

Source: Bronze Age tomb groaning with riches found in Greece

Source: The Linear B “pakana” or – sword – series of tablets, their translations and the implications: PART A

Source: BING images search reveals that the majority of Linear B tablets from Knossos & Pylos are from our own blog:

Source: BING images search reveals that the majority of Linear B tablets from Knossos & Pylos are from our own blog: passes 10,000,000 users + my account is in the top 1 % passes 10,000,000 users + my account is in the top 1 %, meaning that my account is in the top 100,000 users.

Click to visit each post:

academia 10 M

richard vallance academia

Actual size original tablets & fragments at Knossos from Scripta Minoa

Original tablets & fragments at Knossos from Scripta Minoa, followed by facsimiles with clear text: Click to ENLARGE


The fragment (left) and apparently intact tablet (right) at Knossos from Scripta Minoa are approximately actual size. We can easily see that the striations, ridges, pockmarks, wear and tear, inter alia, make it difficult to read the originals. Notice how tiny they are. The facsimiles are, however, very easy to read.

The fragment (left) and apparently intact tablet (right) both have the supersyllabogram MO, otherwise known as an adjunct, meaning “single” or “one” .

I shall be posting more fragments and tablets illustrating the supersyllabogram ZE, meaning  “a pair of” or “a team of” in the next two posts.


Source: Added to The Role of Supersyllabograms in Mycenaean Linear B

Added to The Role of Supersyllabograms in Mycenaean Linear B: Click to VISIT

role of supersyllabograms

The Role of Supersyllabograms in Mycenaean Linear B, talk on July 1 at the Third Interdisciplinary Conference, Thinking Symbols, Pultusk Academy of the Humanities, Poland -  my talk centred on the role of what were previously – and erroneously – called “adjuncts” in Mycenaean Linear B. With 35 in total, there are for more of them and they fulfill a role far more significant than had previously been assumed. In the majority of cases, one syllabogram replaces entire phrases and even sentences.  No one had identified, isolated and classified them all until I did so in 2014-2015.

The Archangel Michael Defeating Satan by Guido Reni (1635) L’archange Michel et la défaite de Satan

in Mycenaean Linear B – en  en linéaire B mycénienne: Click to ENLARGE = cliquer pour ÉLARGIR :


Source: Quelle horreur à Paris ! What a horrific mess in Paris!

The punishment of ISIS in Mycenaean Linear B for its vicious attack on Paris! The dogs of hell!

La punition d’Isis en linéaire B mycénienne suite à son attentat brutal à Paris ! Qu’ils soient dévorés par les chiens d’enfer !

Je suis Paris mycenaean

Visualiser = Also check TWITTER! Quelle horreur à Paris ! What a horrific mess in Paris!


Visualiser aussi mon compte Twitter :
Also check my Twitter account for Tweets:


Quelle horreur à Paris ! What a horrific mess in Paris! Click to ENLARGE Cliquer pour ELARGIR !

Je suis Paris

#PorteOuverte attaques horrifiques à Paris doivent réveiller le monde entier ! C’est la guerre !

#PorteOuverte horrific attacks in Paris should wake the whole world up! This is war!

Quelle horreur à Paris ! Isis n’a plus de visage humain ! C’est une monstruosité ! Que Dieu épargne leurs âmes pourries !  Qui d’autre en est capable? 
Wikipédia: Attentats du 14 novembre 2015 en Île-de-France 


What a horrific mess in Paris! Isis has lost all semblance of humanity! It’s monstrous! May God spare their rotted souls! Who else can?

Wikipedia: November 15 Paris Attacks 

Photos from the Paris Attacks


Supersyllabogram A for amphora with the aromatic and dye saffron UPDATE


The supersyllabogram A for amphora is usually associated with vessels, and in that context it means that the vessel concerned is clearly an amphora, as illustrated below:

vase A  

This, the standard use of A as a supersyllabogram for vessels, is fully documented in my article, An Archaeologist’s translation of Pylos Tablet TA 641-1952 (Ventris), with an introduction to supersyllabograms in the vessels & pottery Sector in Mycenaean Linear B, to be published in the February 2016 issue of Archaeology and Science (Belgrade) ISSN 1452-7448. Following is the text of my discussion of the standard use of the SSYL A for amphora from this article:

Yet the most astonishing characteristic of supersyllabograms in the pottery and vessels sector of the Minoan-Mycenaean economy is this: the majority of them are attributive, and dependent on the ideograms they qualify. Attributive dependent supersyllabograms always appear inside the ideogram which they qualify, never adjacent to it. They always describe an actual attribute of the ideogram. For instance, the syllabogram a inside the ideogram for a vessel with 2 handles is the first syllabogram, i.e. the first syllable of the Mycenaean word apiporewe, unequivocally identifying the vessel as an amphora. But why even bother noting this, when it is obvious that the ideogram in question is in fact that for an amphora? Again, I repeat, the Mycenaean scribes never used any device without a reason. In this particular case, the reason, I believe, is apparent. Any scribe who places the syllabogram a inside the ideogram for what is probably an amphora anyway, does so on purpose to draw our attention to the fact that he is tagging said vessel as a highly valuable and very likely ornate specialty amphora fashioned specifically for the palace elite, and not any old amphora at all, as we see illustrated here in Figures 12 and 13: click to ENLARGE  

Fig. 12

l fig 12 minoan-amphora

Fig. 13:

m fig 13 MERI amphora

The distinction is crucial. I can conceive of no other reason why any Mycenaean scribe would resort to such a ploy other than to identify the vessel in question as a precious commodity.  Similarly, the simplified and streamlined syllabogram sa inside the ideogram for a vessel on a stand is, in my estimation, almost certainly the supersyllabogram for an unknown pre-Greek, possibly Minoan word for raw flax, the agricultural crop the ancient Greeks called rino = linon, from which linen (being the selfsame word in both Mycenaean and ancient alphabetical Greek) is derived. Both of these supersyllabograms are incharged, a term I have had to coin to describe the presence of syllabograms inside ideograms, given its complete absence in  previous research on so-called  “adjuncts” to Linear B ideograms, in other words, supersyllabograms.

END of discussion

The supersyllabogram A with the ideogram for – saffron:

Yet after my submission of this article to Archaeology and Science, I discovered another use of the same supersyllabogram, the vowel a, this time in conjunction with the ideogram for saffron, as illustrated by these 3 tablets from Knossos: 


Translations of these tablets:

KN 669 K j 21
Linear B Latinized:
line 1: yo wheat 195 + saffron in amphorae 43 + saffron 45
line 2: (syllabogram truncated right, probably ma for -ama-) yo wheat 143 + danetiyo + wheat 70 + saffron 45


line 1: yo? 195 units of wheat + 43 small amphorae filled with saffron & 45 units of saffron harvested (the units being very small)
line 2: ma for -ama? = at the same time, meaning along with yo? 143 units of wheat +  
70 units of wheat on loan + 45 units of saffron (harvested)

NOTE that the amphorae containing saffron would have to be small, very much like perfume bottles, given that saffron threads would not take up much space. 
KN 851 K j 03
Linear B Latinized:
line 1: syllabogram truncated right, uncertain, possibly -i- ) yo wheat + epikere  + wheat (right truncated, amount unknown)
line 2: ama
line 3: saffron in small amphorae 46 (or possibly more due to right truncation)

line 1: i? yo? uncertain amount of wheat well planted (from the earth) + uncertain amount of wheat
line 2: along with
line 3: 46 (or more) units of saffron in small amphorae

KN 852  K j 01
Linear B Latinized:
line 1: dawo amaepikere + wheat 10,000 (or more, being right truncated)
line 2: saffron in amphorae 70 + saffron 20

line 1: i? yo? along with (= ama, prefix of amaepikere) 10,000 units of well planted wheat from Dawos (Dafos)
line 2: 70 units of saffron in small amphorae + 20 units of saffron (harvested)  

This application of the supersyllabogram a for saffron I find truly intriguing. Yet again, it clearly designates an amphora, but in this context a small amphora which contains saffron, which takes up little space. Now since saffron is an aromatic which is usually refined to delicate threads plucked from the flower of the same name, as illustrated here:


it naturally follows that, if it is stored in an amphora, represented by the supersyllabogram a, the amphora must be small and capped with a stopper with a handle to prevent the saffron from blowing away. I am not sure how the Minoans and Mycenaeans fabricated the caps with handles for a small amphora filled with saffron, but it strikes me that they (the caps) would have been made of pottery of some kind. The cap with a handle would have had to be fashioned so that it was air tight. It is scarcely any wonder that the Minoans and Mycenaeans would have stored saffron in this fashion, as this extremely precious and expensive aromatic would have been used as a dye or its finely woven threads would have been woven into textiles, often ritually offered to divinities, as well as being used in perfumes, medicines, and body washes. See Wikipedia, Saffron: click to READ:

wikipedia saffron

There exists a stunning fresco the "Saffron Gatherers" fresco of the "Xeste 3" building. According to Wikipedia, this is one of many Minoan style frescoes depicting saffron; they were found at the Bronze Age settlement of Akrotiri, on the Aegean island of Santorini. which illustrates the harvesting of saffron, of which we see here a close up detail: click to ENLARGE


Source: PDF uploaded to application to Minoan Linear A & Mycenaean Linear B of AIGCA (artificial intelligence geometric co-ordinate analysis)

Source: PDF uploaded to application to Minoan Linear A & Mycenaean Linear B of AIGCA (artificial intelligence geometric co-ordinate analysis)

Virginia Views

Country Living for Beginners

Varina's Moon Rising

To Strive, To Seek, To Find, And Not To Yield


4 out of 5 dentists recommend this site

ArchaeoFox: Exploring the World Through the Past

Follow the research of an Archaeology Phd student over the next four years: The things he discovers, the places it brings and the people he meets along the way.

Rafael Tenório

Jornalista - Redator - Blogueiro


He Come Groovin' Up Slowly

A Closer Look

This is the blog where I read, think about reading or complain about it.

Simple Pleasures

Visual Poetry, Photography and Quotes

Something For Everyone's Needs


This site is the cat’s pajamas

The top 10 of Anything and Everything!!!

The top 10 of just about anything everything, from cakes to cats and dogs to caravans. Always a laugh, always worth seeing.

My Blog

The greatest site in all the land!

The Neighborhood

formerly known as Kendall F. Person, thepublicblogger

Poems & People

what if poems could be symphonies, and people their orchestra?


lost in the world

Daily (w)rite

A Daily Ritual of Writing

Indie Hero

Brian Marggraf, Author of Dream Brother: A Novel, Independent publishing advocate, New York City dweller

Living and Lovin

Living Life surrounded by all I love. PEACE

Drew Iaconis

Everything on Mindset, Affiliate Marketing & Blogging

Erika Fuego | iWrite

Passion is your soul saying hi. This is my hello. These are my thoughts, feelings and words. Welcome to my world fellow Gods and Goddesses.


HarsH ReaLiTy

A Good Blog is Hard to Find


4 out of 5 dentists recommend this site

Eric Carlson (awolsurfer)

Building a Business While Still Having a Life...

On The Upside

Saddle up! Let's take a ride...

entregue a solidão

é oque me resta falar e oque me sobra sentir

Grady P Brown - Author

Superheroes - Autism - Fantasy - Science Fiction

Myblog's Blog

Ακόμα ένα blog στο

five second stories

designs by robert clear

Today's New Reason to Believe

Integrating Science and Faith


taller de escritura, lectura y sugerencias de estilo, redacción de contenido para sitios web o presentaciones

Sociología Jurídica Crítica

Para un nuevo sentido común en el Derecho.

Johnstone Kinnear

Johnstone Kinnear: IT & Systems Development Consultancy

Marie Marshall

Author. Poet. Editor.


so many songs we forgot to play

The Purple Humanist

anecdotes and musings about Classics, Higher Education, Technology, and me


Tol eressëa Urwendilwa

DIANABUJA'S BLOG: Africa, The Middle East, Agriculture, History and Culture

Ambling through the present and past with thoughts about the future


Philosophy and Theology

Espen Stenersrød- From Pen To Heart

Jack Kerouac with a scent of Henry Vaughn


Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,453 other followers

%d bloggers like this: