We have a new student of Mycenaean Linear B, our third, Dante Aramideh of Holland


We have a new student of Mycenaean Linear B, our third, Dante Aramideh of Holland:

We have a new student of Mycenaean Linear B, our third, Dante Aramideh of Holland. Here are Dante’s first 2 translations.

 

dante-aramideh-first-2-translations-from-mycenaean-linear-b

 

She is 17 years old, and the youngest of our 3 students, the first being Rita Roberts of Crete, who is the senior of the three, and who has been with us since 2014, and who is by far our most advanced student, being as she is in her second year of university studies. Our second student to come on board is Thalassa Farkas of Canada, whose age falls in between that of Dante Aramideh and Rita Roberts. Thalassa is making rapid progress in learning how to decipher Mycenaean Linear B, as attested by her translation of these two tablets:

 

a-thalassa-farkas-liner-b-kn-1126-e-c-208

b-thalassa-farkas-ashmolean-museum-tablet-a

 

Both Dante and Thalassa are familiar with alphabetical ancient Greek, while Rita Roberts is learning it.

Translation of Knossos tablet KN 783 B 0 4: the practioner’s tablet


Translation of Knossos tablet KN 783 B 0 4: the practioner’s tablet

Linear B tablet Kn 783 B o 04 at the practitioners or teachers place

The “practioner’s” tablet appears to refer to a medical practitioner. In classical Greek, the word didaskaleios always refers to a  “teacher”. But it cannot literally mean this in Minoan/Mycenaean times, because there was no literature as such to teach. However, medical practitioners or doctors could teach their disciples or students.  This is what I believe this tablet is about. I cannot be sure; no one can. In addition to the medical component, there must have also been a religious one, since in the ancient world, medical practices were more often than not, conducted under the auspices of favourable religious omens.