summer haiku d’été – cool cat how I leap = chat sage comme je saute


summer haiku d'été – cool cat how I leap = chat sage comme je saute





cool cat how I leap
over the lush grass...
no moon? big deal

chat calme comme je saute
par-dessus l'herbe verdoyante ...
pas de lune ? alors ?

Richard Vallance

© by/ par Richard Vallance 2020

painting at a friend's place = peinture chez un ami


senryu – you see? if your love = oui si ton amour


senryu – you see? if your love = oui si ton amour

for Scott Snow and all my friends in the whole wide world
pour Scott Snow et tous mes amis à travers le monde





you see? if your love
is the half-life of stars
you illumine them

oui si ton amour
c'est la demi-vie des étoiles
tu les illumines

Richard Vallance


© by/ par Richard Vallance 2020

photo public domain/ domaine public Pixabay



summer haiku d’été – the moon has set = la lune se couche


summer haiku d'été – the moon has set = la lune se couche





the moon has set
with the Pleiades...
all alone I sleep

la lune se couche
et les Pléiades ...
je dors toute seule

Richard Vallance

© by Richard Vallance 2020

photos public domain/ domaine public

The texts in the left pane are overlaid on the painting, The Pleiades (1885), by the American painter Elihu Vedder (1836-1923).

These texts consist of:
1. the original poem by Sappho (ca. 630-570 BCE) in Aeolic Greek, which is considered to be one of the most exquisite brief lyrics in all history.
2. the original poem transcribed by myself into the early Greek syllabary, Mycenaean Linear B (ca. 1400-1200 BCE), which in turn I have transcribed into the alphabet so that you can read it aloud (even if you don't understand it).
3. the original poem transcribed by myself into the Greek syllabary, Arcado-Cypriot Linear C (ca. 1100-400 BCE), , which in turn I have transcribed into the alphabet so that you can read it aloud (even if you don't understand it).
4. My literal translation of Sappho's lyrics into English.
5. My literal translation of Sappho's lyrics into French.

The text in the right pane is my own original haiku based on Sappho's lyrics.


Les textes sur le panneau à gauche se superposent sur la peinture, Les Pléiades ( 1885 ), par le peintre américain Elihu Vedder ( 1836-1923 ).

Les textes sont les suivants :
1. le poème originel par Sappho (vers 630 - 570 av. J.-C. ) en grec éolic, qu'on estime être l'un des poèmes lyriques des plus exquis dans toute l'histoire.
2. ce même poème que j'ai transcrit en Linéaire B mycénien (vers 1400 - 1200 av. J.-C. ), ce qu'on désigne une syllabaire. J'ai ensuite transcit ce text en caractères alphabétiques afin que vous puissiez le lire à haute voix, même si vous n'y comprenez rien.
3. the original poem transcribed by myself into the Greek syllabary, Arcado-Cypriot Linear C (ca. 1100-400 BCE), , which in turn I have transcribed into the alphabet so that you can read it aloud (even if you don't understand it).
4. My literal translation of Sappho's lyrics into English.
5. My literal translation of Sappho's lyrics into French.

The text in the right pane is my own original haiku based on Sappho's lyrics.

  



double senryu – in the cat’s eyes = aux yeux du chat + in our human eyes = aux yeux des humains


double senryu – in the cat's eyes = aux yeux du chat + in our human eyes = aux yeux des humains




in the cat's eyes
a universe
of silver suns

aux yeux du chat
un univers
de soleils d'argent

un gatto vede
un universo
di soli d'argento




in our human eyes
a universe
of black holes

aux yeux des humains
un univers
de trous noirs

un umano vede
un universo
di buchi neri

Richard Vallance

photos public domain

summer haiku d’été – follow the stars = suivre les étoiles


summer haiku d’été – follow the stars = suivre les étoiles

follow the stars
not the ghosts in the forest...
the stars are angels

stars in the forest 620

suivre les étoiles
pas les fantômes forestiers ...
les étoiles ? les anges !

Richard Vallance

summer haiku d’été – your birthday in Japanese kanji, for Régis Auffray = ton anniversaire en kanji japonais, pour Régis Auffray


summer haiku d’été – your birthday in Japanese kanji, for Régis Auffray = ton anniversaire en kanji japonais, pour Régis Auffray

the forest wishes
in so many whispers
upon shooting stars

shooting stars 620

le bois fait son voeu
sur les étoiles filantes
en chuchotements

Richard Vallance

The day kanji for the 13th. day = whisper and the 8th. month = star

Le kanji du treizième jour du mois, c’est le chuchotement , et celui pour le huitième mois, c’est l’étoile.   

summer haiku d’été – your Water Music = ta Musique de l’eau


summer haiku d’été – your Water Music = ta Musique de l’eau  

your Water Music,
our fireworks over the Thames
starrier than stars

Water Music 620

ta Musique de l’eau ,
feux d’artifice à la Tamise
plus qu’étoilés

Richard Vallance 

winter haiku d’hiver – the northern lights = l’aurore boréale


winter haiku d’hiver –  the northern lights = l’aurore boréale 

the northern lights, 
stardust bursts and stars
you may wish upon!

stardust and stars 620

l’aurore boréale, 
la poussière d’étoiles,
tes souhaits secrets !

Richard Vallance

summer haiku – shooting stars = des étoiles filantes


summer haiku – shooting stars = des étoiles filantes

shooting stars
streak over our campsite –
fireflies our wee stars

shootingstars 620

des étoiles filantes
survolent le site de camping  – 
lucioles nos étoiles

Richard Vallance

senryu – I see you love me = je vois que tu m’ aimes


senryu – I see you love me = je vois que tu m’ aimes

I see you love me!
your eyelashes flutter,
stars in your eyes

stars in your eyes 620

je vois que tu m’aimes !
tes sourcils volettent,
étoiles dans tes yeux

Richard Vallance & Mark, age 6


based on this wonderful little quote by a 6 year old boy.

When you love somebody your eyelashes go up and down and little stars come out of you. (Mark, age 6)

summer haiku d’été – clearing the sweat lodge = la suerie ouverte


summer haiku d’été – clearing the sweat lodge = la suerie ouverte

clearing the sweat lodge,
we cool off by the stars – 
so many fireflies

seeat lodge fireflies haiku 620

la suerie ouverte,
l’on se rafraîchit la nuit  –
tant de lucioles
 
Richard Vallance


This marvellous event actually took place in 2004. I was in a sweat lodge with several others at Maniwaki, Quebec, and when we emerged from the stifling heat were amazed to see thousands of fireflies outside.

En 2004, j’ai subi cette experience sublime quand je suis sorti de la suerie avec plusieurs autres à Maniwaki, au Québec. Libérés de la chaleur accablante, nous étions étonnés de voir des milliers de lucioles en dehors. 

summer haiku d’été – so many stars = étonné par les étoiles


summer haiku d’été -  so many stars = étonné par les étoiles

so many stars
in the stray cat’s eyes,
fireflies


stray cat stars

le chat errant
étonné par les étoiles, 
lucioles

Richard Vallance



Academia.edu THESIS The Minoan and Mycenaean Agricultural Trade and Trade Routes in the Mycenaean Empire by Rita Roberts


Academia.edu THESIS The Minoan and Mycenaean Agricultural Trade and Trade Routes in the Mycenaean Empire by Rita Roberts:

Click on this logo to download her thesis:

minoan and mycenaean main

We are proud to announce that Rita Roberts has fulfilled the requirements of her second year of university, and has passed with a mark of 85 %. We have awarded her 90 % for thesis, The Minoan and Mycenaean Agricultural Trade and Trade Routes in the Mycenaean Empire, which is a finely researched document I highly recommend to any and all. It deals in great detail with every conceivable aspect of Minoan and Mycenaean agricultural trade via their trade routes in the Mycenaean Empire, ca. 1600-1450 BCE. We congratulate Rita on her splendid achievement, and we look forward to her fuflling the exacting requirements of her third and final year of university which commences on July 1 2018, Canada Day. Once she has completed her third year, she will have earned her Bachelor of Arts degree in Minoan and Mycenaean studies.

The Antikythera mechanism is a 2,100-year-old computer


The Antikythera mechanism is a 2,100-year-old computer:

Wikipedia
Antikythera mechanism Wikipedia

116 years ago (1902), divers found a chunk of bronze off a Greek island. It has radically changed our understanding of human history.

One hundred sixteen years ago, an archaeologist was sifting through objects found in the wreck of a 2,000-year-old vessel off the Greek island Antikythera. Among the wreck’s treasures, fine vases and pots, jewellery and, fittingly enough, a bronze statue of an ancient philosopher, he found a peculiar contraption, consisting of a series of brass gears and dials mounted in a case the size of a mantel clock. Archaeologists dubbed the instrument the Antikythera mechanism. The genius — and mystery — of this piece of ancient Greek technology is that arguably it is the world’s first computer. If we gaze inside the machine, we find clear evidence of at least two dozen gears, laid neatly on top of one another, calibrated with the precision of a master-crafted Swiss watch. This was a level of technology that archaeologists would usually date to the sixteenth century AD. But a mystery remained: What was this contraption used for? 

To archaeologists, it was immediately apparent that the mechanism was some sort of clock, calendar or calculating device. But they had no idea what it was for. For decades, they debated. Was the Antikythera a toy model of the planets or was it a kind of early astrolabe, a device which calculates latitude?

IMAGE ancient

At long last, in 1959, Princeton science historian Derek J. de Solla Price provided the most convincing scientific analysis of this amazing device to date. After a meticulous study of the gears, he deduced that the mechanism was used to predict the position of the planets and stars in the sky depending on the calendar month. The single primary gear would move to represent the calendar year, and would, in turn, activate many separate smaller gears to represent the motions of the planets, sun and moon. So you could set the main gear to the calendar date and get close approximations for where those celestial objects in the sky on that date. And Price declared in the pages of Scientific American that it was a computer: “The mechanism is like a great astronomical clock ... or like a modern analogue computer which uses mechanical parts to save tedious calculation.”
 
Anticythera mechanism frontal

Antikythera mechanism original
It was a computer in the sense that you, as a user, could input a few simple variables and it would yield a flurry of complicated mathematical calculations. Today the programming of computers is written in digital code, a series of ones and zeros. This ancient analog clock had its code written into the mathematical ratios of its gears. All the user had to do was enter the main date on one gear, and through a series of subsequent gear revolutions, the mechanism could calculate variables such as the angle of the sun crossing the sky. As a point of referencdee, mechanical calculators using gear ratios to add and subtract, didn’t surface in Europe until the 1600s. 

Since Price’s assessment, modern X-ray and 3D mapping technology have allowed scientists to peer deeper into the remains of the mechanism to learn even more of its secrets. In the early 2000s, researchers discovered text in the guise of an instruction manual that had never been seen before, inscribed on parts of the mechanism. The text, written in tiny typeface but legible ancient Greek, helped them bring closure to complete the puzzle of what the machine did and how it was operated.
 
The mechanism had several dials and clock faces, each which served a different function for measuring movements of the sun, moon, stars, and planets, but they were all operated by just one main crank. Small stone or glass orbs moved across the machine’s face to show the motion of Mercury, Venus, Mars, Saturn, and Jupiter in the night sky and the position of the sun and moon relative to the 12 constellations of the zodiac. Another dial would forecast solar and lunar eclipses and even, amazingly enough, predictions about their colour. Today, researchers surmise that different coloured eclipses were considered omens of the future. After all, the ancient Greeks, like all ancients, were a little superstitious. 

The mechanism consisted of:
- a solar calendar, charting the 365 days of the year 
- a lunar calendar, counting a 19 year lunar cycle 
- a tiny pearl-size ball that rotated to illustrate the phase of the moon, and another dial that counted down the days to regularly scheduled sporting events around the Greek isles, like the Olympics.  The mechanics of this device are absurdly complicated. A 2006, in the journal Nature, a paper plotted out a highly complex schematic of the mechanics that connect all the gears. 

Researchers are still not sure who exactly used it. Did philosophers, scientists and even mariners build it to assist them in their calculations? Or was it a type of a teaching tool, to show students the math that held the cosmos together? Was it unique? Or are there more similar devices yet to be discovered? To date, none others have been found.

Its assembly remains another mystery. How the ancient Greeks accomplished this astonishing feat is unknown to this day. Whatever it was used for and however it was built, we know this: its discovery has forever changed our understanding of human history, and reminds us that flashes of genius are possible in every human era. Nothing like this instrument is preserved elsewhere. Nothing comparable to it is known from any ancient scientific text or literary allusion,” Price wrote in 1959. “It is a bit frightening, to know that just before the fall of their great civilization the ancient Greeks had come so close to our age, not only in their thought, but also in their scientific technology.”

There are amazing fully operational modern versions of the Antikythera Mechanism, such as these:

3d-reconstruction-ancient-antikythera-mechanism-770x437

another modern version of the Antikythera mechanism

Antikythera_model_front_panel_Mogi_Vicentini_2007

Can folks please vote the number of stars you think this post is worth? Someone voted only 3 stars, and I am virtually certain I know who…


Can folks please vote the number of stars you think this post is worth? Someone voted only 3 stars, and I am virtually certain I know who...

Minoan Linear A Glossary134


If you believe the post is worth 4 or 5 stars, please vote to counteract the low vote (3 stars) one unhappy person accorded it.

Thanks so much

Richard