senryu – the unicorn = la licorne = l’unicorno


senryu – the unicorn = la licorne = l'unicorno




fair demoiselle, 
cherish the unicorn...
how he adores you!

belle demoiselle,
chéris la licorne ...
comme il t'adore !

bella demoiselle,
ama l'unicorno
chi ti adora!

Richard Vallance 
   
Tapestry, The Lady and the Unicorn, woven in silk and wool, Flanders 1500
Tapisserie, La dame et la licorne, tissée en soie et laine, Flandres 1500   

winter haiku d’hiver – the silk road = le chemin soyeux


winter haiku d’hiver – the silk road = le chemin soyeux

the silk road
wends towards the orient
in frosty light 

the silk road 620

le chemin soyeux
s’en va vers l’orient –
lumière glacée

Richard Vallance

The Silk Road was the long distance route silk and fine textile traders followed from Italy and Europe to China from the 14th. century onward.

Le Chemin soyeux était la route à longue distance que les marchands suivaient à partir du quatorzième siècle de l’Italie et de l’Europe jusqu’à la Chine.

Linear A fragment HT 55 (Haghia Triada) RECTO: wool and silk dress of a priestess REVISED


Linear A fragment HT 55 (Haghia Triada) RECTO: wool and silk dress of a priestess:

linear-a-fragment-ht-55-recto1

The RECTO of this fragment probably deals with wool and silk textiles. The word KIRO, which appears to mean “box” or “chest”, may imply that there is a silken garment trimmed with wool in a chest. But there is no way to substantiate this as this is a fragment, and so the words do not necessarily string together in any way which makes any real sense. The fragment may imply that a Minoan priestess is wearing a dress of silk trimmed with wool (hence the instrumental singular for wool), which has been recently stored in or is still stored in a chest to retain its freshness. Notice in the modern recreation photo on the left that the trim on the woman’s dress appears to be of wool. Perhaps she is a priestess of one of the peak sanctuaries. This makes sense, as there were many peak sanctuaries in Minoan Crete. Post revised courtesy of Jean-Philippe Gingras.