summer haiku – the saffron goddess = la déesse du safran


summer haiku – the saffron goddess = la déesse du safran

séa saraí
sápa punikása
adakísika *

* The Linear A text of this haiku is absolutely beautiful! Read it for yourself.  Just let the words flow off your tongue, with the stress on the syllables marked with an acute accent. The ancient Minoan language was spoken from around 1,700 – 1,500 BCE. My colleague, Alexandre Solcà and I are in the process of deciphering it. The script it is written in, which appears first in the haiku/haiga above, is called a syllabary, in which each “syllable” consists of a consonant + a vowel, as opposed to an alphabet, in which we find both single consonants and vowels. We believe it is proto-Greek, the immediate predecessor of ancient Greek.



the saffron goddess
her crimson dress
adorned with ivy

la déesse du safran
sa robe cramoisie embellie
de lierre

Richard Vallance

summer haiku d’été – Minoan Linear A saffron goddess haiku in Linear A, English & French


summer haiku d’été – Minoan Linear A saffron goddess haiku in Linear A, English & French

Minoan Linear A haiku saffron goddess

sea sarai
sapa punikasa
adakisika *

* The Linear A text of this haiku is absolutely beautiful!
Read it for yourself. 

the saffron goddess
her crimson dress
adorned with ivy

la déesse du safran
sa robe cramoisie embellie
de lierre

Richard Vallance

summer haiku d’ été − saffron goddess = déesse du safran


summer haiku d’ été − saffron goddess  = déesse du safran

saffron goddess
arrayed in white moiré 
in her sanctuary

Minoan Saffron Goddess with dyed dress

déesse du safran
habillée en blanc moiré
dans son sanctuaire

Richard Vallance

Linear A haiku: the saffron goddess, her crimson dress adorned with ivy


Linear A haiku: the saffron goddess, her crimson dress adorned with ivy:

Minoan Linear A haiku sea sarai the saffron goddess

In this haiku, all of the words except sarai = “flax or saffron” (the latter in this context) are Mycenaean-derived New Minoan (NM1). The onomatopoeia of the 3 phrases rolls off the tongue. Not only is her dress adorned with ivy, apparently she is as well.