summer haiku d’été – the thunderstorm = l’orage d’été = Der Gewittersturm


summer haiku d'été – the thunderstorm = l'orage d'été = Der Gewittersturm





English

the thunderstorm
the rose on her grave
her grandson weeps

français

l'orage d'été
la rose sur sa tombe
son petit-fils pleure

Portuguese

a tempestade
a rosa em seu túmulo
seu neto chora

German

Der Gewittersturm
die Rose auf ihrem Grab
ihr Enkel weint

Richard Vallance

© by/ par Richard Vallance 2020

photo public domain/ domaine public Pixabay




summer haiku – nothing is fairer = rien n’est plus belle


summer haiku – nothing is fairer = rien n'est plus belle






nothing is fairer
than the vermilion rose
than her blush

rien n'est plus belle
que la rose vermeille
que son éclat

Richard Vallance

photo Wikimedia Commons:
https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Vermilion_Rose_PIC00007.JPG

winter haiku d’hiver = woven on the rose = tissée sur la rose


winter haiku d'hiver = woven on the rose = tissée sur la rose

contest for/ concours pour Haiku universel
https://www.facebook.com/groups/881510312054311/1079124202292920/?comment_id=1080101855528488&notif_id=1569594513702178&notif_t=group_comment





woven on the rose
the economy of snow
leaves her room to bloom

tissée sur la rose
l'économie de la neige
la laisse fleurir

Richard Vallance

photo public domain


micropoem 4 lines/ micropoème 4 lignes – love birds = les colombes = le colombe


micropoem 4 lines/ micropoème 4 lignes – love birds = les colombes = le colombe

Contest/ concours/concorso Poetry undocumented
https://www.facebook.com/groups/501135793810770/





love birds
mourning the loss
of the rose
of Eden

les colombes
pleurent la perte
de la rose
d'Éden

le colombe
piangono la perdita
della rosa
dell'Eden

Richard Vallance

photo public domain

autumn haiku – if you are in tears = si tu es en larmes


autumn haiku – if you are in tears = si tu es en larmes





for Barbara Harris and the whole Harris family. Barbara
passed away November 6 2019. Judy Harris, Barbara's
daughter-in-law, is my first cousin. 

if you are in tears
tears are roses in the rain
weeping dew

Richard Vallance

pour Barbara Harris et toute la famille Harris. Barabara est
décédée le 6 novembre 2019Harris, la belle-fille de Barbara,
est ma cousine germaine

si tu es en larmes
tes larmes les roses dans la pluie
versent la rosée

Richard Vallance

photo public domain

autumn haiku d’automne – an early frost = un gel imprévu


autumn haiku d'automne – an early frost = un gel imprévu

in/ en 2 versions/ en 2 versioni





an early frost
bids the rose adieu
is it afraid?

an early frost
bids the rose adieu
who is afraid?  

un gel imprévu
salue la rose adieu
a-t-elle peur ?

un gel imprévu
salue la rose adieu
qui a peur ?

un gelo precoce
dice addio alla rosa
ha paura?

un gelo precoce
dice addio alla rosa
chi ha paura?

Richard Vallance

summer haiku – the wild rose blossoms = l’églantine fleurit


summer haiku – the wild rose blossoms = l'églantine fleurit

the wild rose blossoms 
in roseate radiance
in her own time




l'églantine fleurit,
son éclat si rosâtre
à son rythme

Richard Vallance

photo © by/ par Ellie Brown, with our thanks, avec nos remerciements !

summer haiku – the red, red rose = la rose si rouge


summer haiku – the red, red rose = la rose si rouge

the red, red rose
I cup in your hands  –
the blush on your cheeks




la rose si rouge
que je mets dans tes mains –
tes joues roses

Richard Vallance

summer haiku d’été = the blue moon rose = la rose bleue lunaire


summer haiku d’été = the blue moon rose = la rose bleue lunaire

the blue moon rose
in a cool rainfall
in your blue eyes

the blue moon rose 620

la rose bleue lunaire
dans une averse si fraîche
à tes yeux bleus

Richard Vallance

summer haiku d’été = what is the secret = quel est le secret


summer haiku d’été = what is the secret = quel est le secret

what is the secret
of the rose?
... the dew

dew on a rose 620

quel est le secret
de la rose ?
... la rosée

Richard Vallance

Linear A tablet HT 6 (Haghia Triada), ripe figs, pistachio-nuts, pomegranates & roses


Linear A tablet HT 6 (Haghia Triada), ripe figs, pistachio-nuts, pomegranates & roses:

Linear A tablet HT 6 Haghia Triada

Decipherment:

RECTO:

15 units (something like litres) liquid of ripe figs from fig trees, 24 pistachio-nuts, 10 barley cakes (apparently seasoned with pistachio-nuts), 2 roses, and 4 more units (something like kilograms) of ripe fruit + 22 DAQERA? (some kind of fruit), 22 3/4 units (something like litres or kilograms) falling to earth + 15 1/2 figs

VERSO:

3 growing (grown) ripe (i.e. the figs) with 1 unit (something like a flagon) of drops of wine in 3 units (something like kilograms or kilolitres) of honey, and 66 units (something like kilograms) of DADUMA (some kind of fruit, possibly or even probably grapes) + 3 1/4 units of REKI? + 35 SAMA? + 17 1/2 PA3NINA?

So as we can see, most of the vocabulary on this tablet appears to be Mycenaean-derived. The tablet appears to deal with a wonderful recipe for dessert.

Haiku in Minoan Linear A: the Prince of Lilies, a rose


Haiku in Minoan Linear A: the Prince of Lilies, a rose:

haiku linear a prince of lilies

 

10 Mycenaean Linear B & Minoan Linear A words for plants & spices (grand total = 27)


10 Mycenaean Linear B & Minoan Linear A words for plants & spices (grand total = 27):

Linear B and Linear A plants and spices

This chart lists 10 Mycenaean Linear B & Minoan Linear A words for plants & spices, with the Linear B in the left column, its Minoan Linear A in the middle column, and the English translation in the right column. It should be noted that I had to come up with a few Mycenaean Linear B words for plants on my own, because they are nowhere attested on Linear B tablets, regardless of provenance. Nevertheless, the spellings I have attributed to these words are probably correct. See the chart above. While most Mycenaean Linear B words and their Minoan Linear A words are equivalent, some are quite unalike. For instance, we have serino for celery in Mycenaean Greek and sedina in Minoan, and kitano in Mycenaean Greek versus tarawita in Minoan. There is a critical distinction to be made between Minoan Linear A kuruku, which means crocus, from which saffron is derived, and kanako, its diminutive, referring to its derivative, saffron,  which is identical in form and meaning to its Mycenaean Linear B counterpart. The ultimate termination U in Minoan Linear A always refers to larger objects. Hence, kuruku must mean “crocus” while its diminutive, kanako, means “saffron”, just as in Mycenaean Greek. This latter discovery is my own.

I wish to emphasize as strongly as I can that I did not decipher these words in Minoan Linear A. Previous researchers were able to do so by the process of regressive extrapolation in most of the cases. Regressive extrapolation is the process whereby later words in a known language, in this case Mycenaean Greek, are regressively extrapolated to what philologists consider to have been their earlier equivalents in a more ancient language, in this case, the Minoan language, which is the best candidate which can be readily twinned with Mycenaean  Greek. The primary reason why all of these words can be matched up (relatively) closely in the Minoan language and in Mycenaean Greek is that they are all pre-Indo-European. In other words, Mycenaean Greek inherited most of the words you see in this chart from the Minoan language. It is understood that these words are not Greek words at all, not even in Mycenaean Greek. Almost all  of them survived into classical Greek, and are still in use in modern languages. For instance, in English, we have: cedar, celery, cypress, dittany, lily & olive oil, all of which can be traced back as far as the Minoan language (ca. 3,800 – 3,500 BCE), or some 5,800 years ago.

It is to be noted, however, that I am the first philologist to have ever written out these words in both the Linear A and Linear B syllabaries.

This brings the total number of Minoan Linear A words we have deciphered to at least 27.