Knossos tablet KN 746 M 1 11 according to Sir Arthur Evans (stirrup jars) as translated by Rita Roberts


Knossos tablet KN 746 M 1 11 according to Sir Arthur Evans (stirrup jars) as translated by Rita Roberts:

Knossos Linear B tablet KN 746 M 1 11 as translated by Rita Roberts

 

 

Beautiful photos of some of the magnificent frescoes at Knossos, taken by Richard while he was there on May 1 2012


Beautiful photos of some of the magnificent frescoes at Knossos, taken by Richard while he was there on May 1 2012:

knossos-bull-eapers-fresco

knossos-spectators-fresco-almost-all-women

knossos-blue-olive-trees-fresco

knossos-octopus-fresco

Translation of Pylos tablet TN 996, the famous “bathtub” tablet


Translation of Pylos tablet TN 996, the famous “bathtub” tablet:

Pylos TN 996 linear-b-showing-numbers-of-bath-tubs-and-other-vessels

This was a rather difficult tablet to translate, for several reasons:
1. It is difficult to ascertain whether or not the first word on the first line is a personal name, but it certainly appears to be so.
2. Two of the words on this tablet appear to refer to some type of vessel or pottery, but they appear in no Linear B lexicon (not even Tselentis). The first is pinera in line 2 & the second pokatama in line 4.
3. Some of the words are definitely archaic Mycenaean Greek, but most of these are translatable. For instance, Linear B rewotereyo = (archaic) Greek “leuterios” in line 1 begins with an abbreviated form of the Greek word “leukos”, which means “white”  or “bright” or “light”. So I take this word to mean “a lamp-lighter”, which makes eminent sense in the context.
4. The ideogram is for “bathtub” = asamito in line 1, while the one on line 2 appears to be a variant on the same, but it may mean a “large watering can” to pour warm or hot water into the bathtub.
5. See the comment on po? in the illustration above. The translation “octopi”, meaning “decorated with octopi”, appears solid enough, especially in line 3 where it is paired with the word for “jug”. The translation is less tenable in line 4, where it is paired with “an oil lamp”.


FIVE SECOND STORIES: Theseus and the Minotaur & many more hilarious stories!


FIVE SECOND STORIES: Theseus and the Minotaur & many more hilarious stories!
 
Theseus and the Minotaur: Click to ENLARGE:

minotaur15

Robert Clear does have a very clear name after all.

And click on this BANNER to go to his Blog where you can find his wonderful story:

five second stories MINOTAUR

You will note that I have added the Mycenaean Linear B Greek & ancient Greek for some of the key words in this wonderful story. What truly amazes me is that Robert translated “Minotaur” correctly, as “mino” = small + “taur” = bull, although the spelling of “mino” in Mycenaean Linear B is usually “meno”, but that is fine with me. If it makes Robert and all of his readers happy, that is all that matters.

So I hope you like it as much as I do.

Also, Robert Clear’s home page is here: Click on the BANNER: 

five second stories

He has plenty more 5 second stories on his home page. His 5 second stories are very funny, and some of them hilarious. My personal favourites are:

ELECTRO HENS
ETIQUETTE, HOW IT WORKS
A HYENA, a cross between a cat and a dog! (absolutely hilarious! I should get one. I already have 4 cats)
CEDRIC is convinced that everyone thinks he is DULL. 


Richard



10 of the Loveliest Frescoes from Knossos (Composite): Choose your Favourite(s)


10 of the Loveliest Frescoes from Knossos (Composite): Choose your Favourite(s)! Click to ENLARGE:

composite of frescoes at Knossos
These frescoes are as follows:
[1] The Fresco of the Dolphins in the Queen’s Megaron 
[2] The Spectators Fresco (most likely of the bull leaping contest)
[3] The Octopus Fresco
[4] The Griffin Fresco in the Throne Room of the Queen’s Megaron
[5] The Cup bearers Fresco at the Ceremonial Entrance to the Palace of Knossos
[6] The “Prince of Lilies Fresco”
[7] The “Bluebird Fresco” from the “House of Frescoes” at Knossos
[8] The Bull Fresco on the outer wall of the Bull Portico 
[9] The Fresco often called “Les Parisiennes”
[10] The Spectators Fresco (probably at a dance performance at the theatre of Knossos)

Please note that the originals of all the frescoes at Knossos are now housed in the Heraklion Archaeological Museum. Those found onsite at Knossos are copies, though splendid ones at that. 

Simply choose your favourite fresco(es), just one (1) if you like, or as many as three (3) and either post your choice(s) in Comments for this post, or if you like, you can send you answer(s) to me at either of my e-mail addresses: vallance22@gmail.com OR vallance22@gmx.com

The addresses are not hot linked here. You will have to copy them into your address book, and then send me your answer(s). The more folks who answer, the merrier. So let’s all have a bit of fun! Once I have all the results in, I shall list your own favourite(s), and mine too, of course! This should be plenty of fun for everyone, and besides, I do wonder how much overlap there is in people’s tastes.

Please do participate! We do not usually get much participation from our followers, so now is your chance to rectify the situation. Once we have all the results in, I shall repost all 10 frescoes in a slide show.

Best,    

Richard



Linear B Show & Tell # 4: Amphora Decorated with Spirals


 

Linear B Show & Tell # 4:  Amphora Decorated with Spirals (Click to ENLARGE):

Mycenaean Linear B aporowewe amphora decorated with spirals

Anyone who is at all familiar with Minoan-Mycenaean architectural, fresco and pottery designs knows fully well that the Minoans and Mycenaeans were quite crazy about spirals in their beautiful designs, which proliferate above all else on their exquisite pottery: pithoi (huge storage jars, as seen at Knossos, used to store olive oil and many other commodities), amphorae, vases, jars, bowls, drinking vessels, you name it.

Here is a composite of more exquisite examples + the word for “cup” (Click to ENLARGE):

Kamares Middle Minoan Mycenaean octopus wine cup Minoan Dolphiin Oinos wine cup