Severely damaged Minoan Linear A tablet (joins) from Gournia


Severely damaged Minoan Linear A tablet (joins) from Gournia:

Minoan-Crete-Gournia-Linear-A

This Minoan Linear A tablet (fragment/joins) is even more severely damaged than many other Linear A fragments which are missing most of their text, or are partially illegible. The recurrence of (severely) damaged tablets and fragments is more widespread in Mycenaean Linear B, since there are far more extant tablets in that syllabary (close to 5,000). An example of a badly damaged Linear B tablet from Knossos follows:

Knossos tablet 04-83 damaged

Minoan Linear A tablet from Akrotiri (no. 36) undecipherable


Minoan Linear A tablet from Akrotiri (no. 36) undecipherable:

LinearA joins from Akrotiri no. 36

This Minoan Linear A tablet from Akrotiri (no. 36) is so badly damaged it is undecipherable. I would like to believe that the word on the second join [2] is rutemuda, but there is simply no way of telling, as it is left-truncated. It is questionable whether the first syllabogram in [2] is indeed RU, which is why I have appended a question mark to. Still, this is such a justly famous Minoan Linear A tablet, I felt I would have done it an injustice not to post it. 

Confirmation yet again that Minoan Linear A puko = tripod (3rd. Time)


Confirmation yet again that Minoan Linear A puko = tripod (3rd. Time):

Linear A 19 joins

Minoan Linear A tablet 19 consisting of 2 joins confirms yet again that Minoan Linear A puko = tripod (3rd. Time). Prof. John G. Younger’s interpretation that puko = “bronze” simply does not hold up under even cursory scrutiny, as the following illustration makes perfectly clear.

6 Minoan tripods

Minoan tripods were almost always made of pottery, rarely of bronze. I could find only 1 Minoan tripod made of bronze in my Google image search. So the interpretation “bronze” for puko must be ruled out once and for all.