senryu – do you know? = le sais-tu? = si angeli


senryu – do you know? = le sais-tu?   = si angeli 





consolation in the coronavirus pandemic

do you know? you see
angels live on earth with us 
where they adore us all

la consolation durant la pandémie du coronavirus

le sais-tu? vois-tu ?
des anges vivent parmi nous et
ils nous adorent tous

consolazione durante la pandemia del coronavirus

sì angeli
vivono con noi e
ci adorano

Richard Vallance

© by/ par Richard Vallance 2020
photo public domain/ domaine public Pixabay



By Many Roundelays, a sonnet


By Many Roundelays, a sonnet

by many roundelays 620

for Ludwig van Beethoven, and his Symphony no. 6
in F major, “La Pastorale”, III, Allegro, “Sturm” 

Our Earth, from space, goes spinning, Queen of Spheres,
composing clouds in rounds of roundelays,
so thrilling them they rain allegro tears
all over greening fields by stormed-in bays.
As stallions madly wing on lightning hooves,
they beat the Seven Seas, and break the calm.
They race to hem the hale moon in, that moves
their fears to tear us from our smug aplomb.
Our prayers are vain! They’ll never acquiesce
in any urge to quell our fears of gales,
our foibles sins to them, the stallionesque!
For who can take to heart their stunning tales?
   If they run mad, though I may be God’s fool,
   would poets foam for them where full moons rule?


Richard Vallance, © 2013

senryu – the earth and moon = la terre et la lune


senryu – the earth and moon = la terre et la lune

the earth and moon
in our galaxy’s gaze
eons beyond vision	

the earth and moon	
		
la terre et la lune
que la galaxie regarde 
à perte de vue

Richard Vallance


Haiku © by Richard Vallance, photo © by Gabriel Can


	

summer haiku in Minoan Linear A, ancient Greek, English and French


summer haiku in Minoan Linear A, ancient Greek, English and French: 

haiku in Linear A wine mother earth

Originally written in 2017, and reposted here... 

senryu – Cameron Cuffe


senryu – Cameron Cuffe

Cameron Cuffe
a cutie on Krypton,
still cuter on Earth!

cameron cuffe krypton 620

Cameron Cuffe
si mignon à Kypton,
plus mignon sur terre !

Richard Vallance

If anyone is wondering whether I am a raving gay boy, I am and proud of it too!

Si par hazard on se demande si je suis gai, et bien, je le suis et j’en suis vraiment fier ! 
 

9 new Minoan Linear A words under U-WI, all of but 1 of which are probably of proto-Greek origin


9 new Minoan Linear A words under U-WI, all of but 1 of which are probably of proto-Greek origin:

u-wi

The 9 new Minoan Linear A words under U-WI are all probably of proto-Greek origin. As for those terms beginning with the syllabograms WA & WI, I have come to the conclusion that they all begin with digamma, meaning that digamma is even more common in Minoan Linear A than it is in Mycenaean Linear B. If we take into account that every last one of the Minoan Linear A words beginning with digamma would appear without digamma in Mycenaean Linear A, they all are equivalent to their Mycenaean Linear B and ancient Greek counterparts (the latter having dropped digamma for good). For instance, [3] TERA is almost certainly the ancient volcanic island of Thera, now Santorini, while [5] WAJA is equivalent to archaic Greek aia = earth, land and [7] WIJA is fem. pl. = arrows. The only word I have been unable to satisfactorily decipher is [6], of which I was able to decipher the first 2 syllabograms. You have to read the table to see my translation.

With this, we have come full circle to the end of our remarkable journey towards the decipherment of Minoan Linear A. Now that I have deciphered every last word I believe is of proto-Greek, proto-Hebrew, proto-Semitic or proto-Scythian origin, I have reached a cumulative grand TOTAL of 62 new Minoan Linear A words, expanding my original Minoan Linear A Glossary of 107 words = 21.5% of the total extant Linear B lexicon of 510 terms by my arbitrary count to a TOTAL = 169 words = 33 % of the total Minoan Linear A lexicon, which is exactly the sum and percentage I had predicted! This amounts to what is demonstrably a workable decipherment of the Minoan language, including of its grammar, which had evaded me before.

Now all I have to do is to decipher as many of the 27 supersyllabograms in Minoan Linear A, beyond the 9 I have already deciphered. Now that I am armed with 62 new Minoan Linear A words, I am quite sure that I shall be able to decipher quite a few more of the supersyllabograms, and with that goal accomplished, I shall have effectively and once and for all deciphered the Minoan language.