senryu – raping wives and kids = femmes et enfants 

raping wives and kids
before you slaughter them –
you Isis scum!

you ISIS scum!

femmes et enfants
violées et massacrées –
cochons d’Isis !

Richard Vallance

I make absolutely no apologies for this senryu. Period.

Je ne regrette pas du tout d’avoir écrit ce senryu. Point final.


autumn haiku d’automne – the stone angel = l’ange de pierre


autumn haiku d’automne – the stone angel = l’ange de pierre

the stone angel
on her children’s tomb –
infinity’s love

stone angel


l’ange de pierre
sur la tombe de ses enfants –
l’amour infini

Richard Vallance

I don’t think I have ever seen anything as pitiable as this sketch by a girl of a tiger crying in a zoo


I don’t think I have ever seen anything as pitiable as this sketch by a girl of a tiger crying in a zoo:

crying tiger

She says she hated going to the zoo after she saw the poor tiger pacing back and forth in its cage. And I am sure she saw tears in its eyes. It is just disgusting and utterly shocking how we as so-called adults are doing everything in our power (and we have far too much of that) to destroy every other living soul on our planet. The feed accompanying this astonishing sketch warns us that Sometimes children are wiser than adults. Not only wiser, but clearly far more in tune with our planet.

The child is father of the man;
And I could wish my days to be
Bound each to each by natural piety.

(William Wordsworth, My Heart Leaps Up)

As for myself I cannot stand zoos, and I believe they should all be banned forever. Here are a few sickening examples why:

composite vile cruelty to animals in zoos

Just who do we think we are? The most intelligent species on planet earth? What a laugh!

BUT

Wild life parks with plenty of space for animals to roam in are another story altogether. At least the animals have plenty of room to roam around in. Thank God for small blessings.

Examples are:

Le Parc Oméga, Montebello, Québec, Canada (CLICK photo for lots of lovely pics!):

parc omega montebello quebec

 

San Diego Zoo Safari Park

san diego safari park

From time to time, I shall be posting more environmentally sensitive topics here on LBK&M, in spite of the fact that they have nothing to do with Linear A, B or C.

 

7 more Minoan Linear A words under PA-PAI, 6 of possible proto-Greek origin & 1 of proto-Scythian origin


7 more Minoan Linear A words under PA-PAI, 6 of possible proto-Greek origin & 1 of proto-Scythian origin:

minoan-linear-a-words-under-pa-pai-of-possible-scythian-and-proto-greek-origins

Of these 7 new Minoan Linear A words under PA-PAI, 6 are of possible proto-Greek origin, while 1 [5] is, surprisingly, probably the (proto-) Scythian infinitive pata = the ancient Greek infinitive, kteinein = “to slaughter, slay”. Of the remaining 7, 2 [1] & [6] are very likely variant spellings of the same word Paean, which may mean “physician” or “saviour”, but since the attributed meaning “physician” is not standard Greek, the decipherment is surely open to question. The standard Mycenaean Linear B word for “physician” is iyate, equivalent to the ancient Greek iater (Latinized). [2] PAKU may possibly be an archaic Minoan Linear A word equivalent to ancient Greek pakhos (Latinized), but since the Minoan Linear A ultimate U, while attested everywhere, can only speculatively be linked with the ancient Greek ultimate OS (Latinized), PAKU may not be a valid proto-Greek word at all. But if it is , [2a] PAKUKA may very well be the feminine singular for the same. [3] PARIA is so close to the ancient Greek, pareia, that it is quite likely it means “the cheek piece (of a helmet)”, especially in view of the fact that military terminology is very common in Mycenaean Linear B, and may thus have been so in Minoan Linear A. But this is not necessarily the case. [4] PASU, once again terminating in the commonplace Linear A ultimate U, may possibly be the Minoan Linear A equivalent of Mycenaean Linear B paso, which is neut. singular for “everything”, but this decipherment is speculative. [7] PAIDA is possibly an archaic proto-Greek form of the ancient Greek paidia =  “children”. [8] PAISASA may be an archaic form of the second pers. sing. aorist (simple past tense) of the Greek verb paizo = “to play, to engage in sport”, which is itself in turn the verb corresponding to [7] the putative noun, PAIDA = “children”.

In short, every last one of these decipherments of  6 Minoan Linear A words of possible proto-Greek origin (excluding [5], which is (proto-) Scythian, is speculative.

However, if all of them are on target, which is doubtful, the potential total number of Minoan Linear A words of putative proto-Greek and Scythian origin rises to 42 (or less).