January 2016 is “chariot” month. So let’s take you for a ride!


January 2016 is “chariot” month. So let’s take you for a ride!

Here is the first tablet illustrating a chariot with 2 stallions being driven by a fellow whose name translates something like “longshoreman”, which makes sense if the fellow is a post messenger who frequently drives to and from Knossos and its harbour, Amnisos.

a-kn-sc-230-translation1

Rita Roberts and I shall be posting at least a dozen chariot-related tablets in January.

So keep posted.

Richard


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vallance22

Historical linguist, Linear B, Mycenaean Greek, Minoan Linear A, Arcado-Cypriot Linear C, ancient Greek, Homer, Iliad, only Blog ENTIRELY devoted to Linear B on Internet; bilingual English- French, read Latin fluently, read Italian & ancient Greek including Linear B well, Antikythera Mechanism

7 thoughts on “January 2016 is “chariot” month. So let’s take you for a ride!”

    1. While this translation makes some sense, there are in my opinion three significant errors in it as it stands.
      These are:
      1. It is much more likely that he is WEARING the armour than receiving it.
      2. It is more likely that he either has or is driving the chariot. Linear B tablets almost never
      include verbs, so we must divine the meaning. The most likely interpretations are either that
      he HAS or that he is driving the chariot.
      3. Minoan Mycenaean chariots ALWAYS had 2 horses.

      Thanks for your interpretation. If you have any further comments in response, please feel free
      to offer them.

      PS I am going to visit your blog and bookmark it, plus add it to the links on this site.
      I hope you will reciprocate.

      Glad to have you on board. Just wondering what your first name is…

      Cheers

      Richard

      I am not sure whether or not LBK&M is the largest general Minoan, Linear A, Mycenaean Linear B
      & Arcado-Cypriot Linear C (which I also read) on the Internet, but it is.

      Richard

      Like

    2. Woops! Your are right about the armoured chariot! I should have said that the
      driver was wearing armour. Sorry. I shall correct the post.

      Thanks!

      Also check me out on academia.edu

      https://westernu.academia.edu/RichardVallance/Papers

      where I stand in the top 1 % of contributors.

      I am also about to have 27 page article on an archaeological translation of Pylos tablet TA 641-1952
      in Archaeology and Science (Belgrade) Vol. 10 (2014) ISSN ISSN 1452-7448. It is annual, apparently
      published every two years.

      Thanks again

      Richard

      Like

    3. Hi again.

      Actually, I already caught that boo boo with the word armed. It did not take long for me to realize that the notion of an armed chariot is as silly as you say it is.

      Thanks again

      Like

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